The WP Minute

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This is Malcolm Peralty here from PressTitan and this is The WP Minute, Episode 119

This past weekend was WordCamp US and Matt Mullenweg did his State of the Word address. It primarily focused on WordPress 5.0 and highlighted what’s next for Gutenberg. Torque Mag highlights some of what happened in their post, including the big call to action that Matt made: learn blocks deeply. Continue reading →

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This is Malcolm Peralty here from PressTitan and this is The WP Minute, Episode 118

WordPress 5.0 launched yesterday, and while a bunch of people are having issues, it wasn’t the end of the world. WordPress is still popular and life moves on. Though I think the WordPress Support forum is going to need a bit of time to adjust and catch up with a ton of issues being posted and many of them relating to plugin conflicts with WordPress 5.0 or just WordPress 5.0 upgrade issues in general. The reviews on Gutenberg today don’t look much better with essentially full pages of one and two-star reviews today alone. Continue reading →

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This is Malcolm Peralty here from PressTitan and this is The WP Minute, Episode 117

WordPress 5.0 is out and its nickname is Bebo. It includes the new block-based editor and we all have to stop calling it Gutenberg now. It is the default WordPress editor from here on out. The release post for the major update looks amazing, including an animated video of how slick Gutenberg should be. It also includes the new default theme, Twenty Nineteen, which looks really good in the post image, but it feels strange when looking at it in use on Matt Mullenweg’s personal blog and looks pretty crummy when looking at the test site on WordPress’ own theme demo area. Continue reading →

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Tomorrow is WordPress 5.0 day. There’s no avoiding it. It is happening! And that’s freaked a few people out, as you can see by a great post on WPTavern. The expectation by many in the community was that if WordPress 5.0 couldn’t be launched by a certain day that we would wait until January, but that doesn’t matter now. Important people in the WordPress community are concerned about what this December release around WordCamp US will do to their plans. Continue reading →

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This is Malcolm Peralty here from PressTitan and this is The WP Minute, Episode 115

Right after I released yesterday’s episode, two things happened: WordPress 5.0 Release Candidate 3 came out and the final release date for WordPress 5.0 was announced. We are going to focus on those today… Continue reading →

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This is Malcolm Peralty here from PressTitan and this is The WP Minute, Episode 114

I didn’t receive any feedback regarding Friday’s episode, so I’m going to assume shorter is better for most of you and go back to my normal way of doing episodes for now. If that’s not the case, and you liked the longer episode format that I used for episode 113, let me know. Continue reading →

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This is Malcolm Peralty here from PressTitan and this is The WP Minute, Episode 113

I’m going to try something a bit different today. Instead of trying to keep the episode under two minutes, I’m going to try to keep each story I cover to under a minute. The overall episode length shouldn’t change too much, but sometimes we might get to three, four or even five minutes in an episode, depending on how many stories there are and how opinionated I’m feeling. Continue reading →

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This is Malcolm Peralty here from PressTitan and this is The WP Minute, Episode 112

Matt Mullenweg has created office hours to listen to people talk about their concerns with Gutenberg and WordPress 5.0. He has opened up twenty-four slots over four days that will be fifteen minutes each where he hopes to connect with as many people as possible. As of this recording, all of the slots have been taken, and if Matt opens up more, I expect those to be immediately taken too. I think this is a really smart move for Matt as the community leader. Continue reading →

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This is Malcolm Peralty here from PressTitan and this is The WP Minute, Episode 111

WordPress.com is giving out free .blog subdomains, so if you don’t want your site to be whatever dot WordPress dot com, you can have it be whatever dot family dot blog or whatever dot news dot blog. It is a nice change for people looking to make their site URL easier to remember, but still not a replacement for purchasing a domain. They aren’t expensive and if you ever want to move off WordPress.com, if you own your domain, it is much easier.

Over on TorqueMag there is a post entitled tips and tools your WordPress site needs, and while I don’t agree that your site needs all of these features, it is a great resource for beginners. They point to page builders, SEO, and more. Two things I don’t agree with are mega menus and image sliders as they typically provide a bunch of page weight bloat and don’t really get used effectively by visitors.

Lastly, 10up, a company I used to work for, is looking for a Creative Director in Seattle, Washington. The company is all remote and work-from-home, so it is interesting to me that they’ve added a position with a location requirement. I wonder if this will continue to happen as the company grows and develops? In person meetings are still a requirement to earn big business and agencies like 10up are trying to make sure they stay competitive. If you know of anyone in Seattle looking to be a Creative Director for a WordPress focused agency, let them know about 10up.

That’s it for today’s WP Minute, thank you all for watching.

Sources:
Free WordPress.com Subdomains
Tips for WordPress Sites
10up Hiring a Creative Director in Seattle

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This is Malcolm Peralty here from PressTitan and this is The WP Minute, Episode 110

Jetpack is changing. Thanks to Gutenberg’s blocks system, Jetpack will be adding blocks for forms, maps, markdown and simple payments. It also brings back publicize, a feature that automatically shared posts to social networks. I still don’t think it is enough for me to move back to Jetpack, but these are some great additions.

I am not sure where you would need to delete a massive number of posts from your WordPress blog, but if you do, then the tutorial on WPBeginner will help you out. It covers two different ways to easily remove as many posts as you need in a quick way.

I wish admin notices in WordPress would go away, but a recent tutorial from Tom McFarlin shows off how easy it is to create them. Ideally, they’d be used like Tom mentions: to show successes and failures, and not part of their product marketing. If you’ve wanted to have notices in the WordPress admin, check out his post.

And just a quick note… As of this recording, WordPress 5.0 isn’t out yet.

That’s it for today’s WP Minute, thank you all for watching.

Sources:
Jetpack 6.8
Bulk Delete WordPress Posts
Create Admin Notices